What are Brush Types

How would you like to have an airbrush to paint glow effects or a marker you can assign blend modes to? Changing brush types makes this possible. Any brush with the Type option can take on the properties of another brush, while retaining the original brush’s stroke quality.


Introducing Brush Types

In all versions of Sketchbook there is a menu for changing the brush type. As mentioned above, this means that any brush can take on the properties of another brush, while retaining the original brush’s stroke quality.

The platform you're one determines how you access Brush Types. The difference between platforms is small.

  • On Desktop, either in the Brush Palette or Brush Library, double-click the brush to open Brush Properties. You will see the Type menu below the brush name.

Colorless brush type

NOTE: The stroke shape won’t change.


  • On Mobile, in the Brush Library, tap Settings. The Brush Types menu is below the example brush stroke.

NaturalBlend_Type




What Brush Types are there?

There are two groups of brush types. Standard is included in the first group. It is set as the default brush type for many brushes. The second group, Blend Modes, work like the layer blend modes.

Blend Mode Brush Types


Using Blend Mode brushes

A Blend Mode brush is any brush that has a blend mode assigned to it. Blend modes change the color of the pixels you paint over.

  1. Double-tap a brush to open its properties. Tap the arrow next to Type to expand the menu.

List of the Brush Types


Change brush type

  1. Select a blend mode from the list:
  • To darken where you paint, try Darken, Multiply, Color Burn, or Linear Burn.
  • To lighten where you paint, try Lighten, Screen, or Linear Dodge (Add).
  • For contrast, try Overlay, Soft Light, or Hard Light.
  • To change components of the color, try Hue, Saturation, Color, or Luminosity.